Monday, May 11, 2009

Warm & Familiar Scenes


In the photography world, pictures are either warm or cool, depending on the primary color cast. Reds tend to give a scene a warm, inviting glow, while blues cast a cool feeling.






A warm scene may include a sunset or sunrise, the colors both powerful and peaceful. It can be the gentle falling leaves of autumn, inducing a nostalgic feeling.






For a writer, a warm scene carries a unique meaning. It is that special scene or scene in our work that continue to draw us back, enticing us with warm feelings. We treasure these moments in our stories and hope that our readers will also identify with the warmth of the scene and emotions of the characters. We hope they will see the visual as clearly as we do.

One scene that stands out for me in Book II of my YA series involves a coffee shop. The two main characters, Sarah and Matt, have temporarily separated. Matt finally locates Sarah in a downtown coffee shop, but rather than go inside to speak with her, he stands outside the window and call her cell phone. I love their exchange, and at the end, Matt says something that causes Sarah to realize he is watching her. When she turns around, she sees him at the window, hand pressed against the glass, and the sunset's glow outlining his form. For me, it's a very emotional and powerful scene.

What scene in your book stands out? What moment is warm and inviting and continues to draw you back to that page?

8 comments:

Chester Campbell said...

A warm scene in The Surest Poison takes place when the Miss Demeanor and Five Felons Poker Club gets together. There's lots of friendly banter between the players as they discuss things important to the plot.

Marvin D. Wilson said...

Very warm post, Diane. :) I like the sounds of that scene in your book, too.

In Owen Fiddler, at the very end of the book, Owen and his ex, Jewel, have a scene where she accepts his humble apologies for the way he behaved as her husband. The scene ends without the reader knowing whether or not they will actually get back together, but it is a touching scene - still wets my eyes when I read it and I've read it - must be a hundred times. :)

Helen Ginger said...

Love that picture of the tree where it looks like it's lit from underneath.

A warm scene from a short story I wrote was when a young girl is riding atop her daddy's shoulders.

Helen
Straight From Hel

Morgan Mandel said...

My upcoming romantic suspense, Killer Career, has a family scene where everyone goes to a fireworks display.

Morgan Mandel
http://morganmandel.blogspot.com

L. Diane Wolfe said...

There's always something that tugs at our own heartstrings, isn't there?

Carolyn Howard-Johnson said...

I never stopped to think of photos this way--artwork, yes. But one of my chapbooks is illustrated by a fantastic photographer, May Lattanzio, and I think that's the reason I like her work so much. It's the mood, silly!
Best,
Carolyn
Coauthor of She Wore Emerald Then: Relections on Motherhood

Ted A. Brooks said...

You made me realize the impact of colors on the soul - warm, cool. I am so thankful I somehow was led to your site.
Angel Blessings

conarnold said...

Your photos are beautiful, and I love the feelings that warm scenes evoke. When I write poetry, having an appropriate photo accompanying it helps stir the feelings and emphasize the imagery of the words. Nice post, Diane!